Found 3 comments on HN
chb · 2018-01-18 · Original thread
Given the tone of so many of these reviews, I can't tell if the first reviewer ("Obi Wan") is being serious/delusional or if s/he's using the pagination of the text to subtly(?) mock the other reviewers. https://www.amazon.com/Million-Random-Digits-Normal-Deviates...
danbruc · 2014-10-28 · Original thread
Glad you asked - we have a book [1][2] for this, at least up to 405.5 KiB.

[1] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Million_Random_Digits_with_10...

[2] http://www.amazon.com/Million-Random-Digits-Normal-Deviates/...

gmazzola · 2009-04-20 · Original thread
I'm sorry if this response is off-topic, but your last question piqued my curiosity so I would like to answer it.

There is an authoritative source of random numbers. In 1955, The RAND Corporation (a Cold War-era think tank) published a wonderful book entitled "A Million Random Digits with 100,000 Normal Deviates". Amazon.com has a copy of it, including some amusing reviews: http://www.amazon.com/Million-Random-Digits-Normal-Deviates/... .

For a good source of truly random numbers accessible from an API, I personally use http://random.org . They use atmospheric noise to create random numbers, which ultimately boils down to the true randomness that is Quantum Mechanics. It's not suitable for high-security applications -- I could do some network trickery and redirect your API request to my server that always returns 1.0 -- but it's better than the PRNGs on modern computers.

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