Found 3 comments on HN
Klockan · 2017-04-25 · Original thread
> those who were underperforming weren’t struggling with the fundamental concepts in the class, but with algebra: the problems were caused by not having an intuitive understanding of, for example, the difference between f(x+a) and f(x)+a.

Those taking that class have spent years trying to learn algebra and still don't get it so we are already trying this.

> I’m no great teacher, but I was able to get all but one of the office hour regulars up to speed over the course of the semester.

Most likely they just memorized the new algebra rules as well. There are lots of studies showing how hard it is to teach students anything tangible, instead most will just try to memorize everything you say.

See for example: https://www.amazon.com/Academically-Adrift-Limited-Learning-...

pierre_d528 · 2016-12-16 · Original thread
Your contribution is very interesting : it shows how little a diploma (a.k.a. "education") has to do with any kind of ability to produce anything useful.

http://oxrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/4/475.abstract

http://oxrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/32/4/538.abstract

http://ner.sagepub.com/content/224/1/R29.abstract

https://newrepublic.com/article/124943/america-overeducation...

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/03043932949...

https://www.hks.harvard.edu/fs/lpritch/Education%20-%20docs/...

http://repec.iza.org/dp5401.pdf

http://www.kcl.ac.uk/ioppn/news/records/2013/December/Differ...

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0160289605...

https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2862754

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ccap/2016/11/01/are-we-still-goi...

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2011/01/18/study_finds_l...

https://www.amazon.com/Academically-Adrift-Limited-Learning-...

http://www.opencolleges.edu.au/informed/features/21-myths-th...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/realspin/2013/05/06/federal-stud...

http://longevity3.stanford.edu/blog/2014/10/15/the-consensus...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/ccap/2016/11/01/are-we-still-goi...

https://www.bloomberg.com/view/articles/2012-12-31/research-...

http://economics.mit.edu/files/10414

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040162505...

http://www.nber.org/papers/w18315

http://www.nber.org/papers/w19895

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/12/upshot/how-to-improve-grad...

http://hechingerreport.org/how-often-do-community-college-st...

https://nces.ed.gov/fastfacts/display.asp?id=40

http://spectrum.ieee.org/at-work/education/the-stem-crisis-i...

http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2013/05/28/half-of-co...

altoz · 2013-08-16 · Original thread
First, about half of people that go to college don't graduate in 6 years. That means the asset isn't upgraded but the costs and loans still live on. http://www.slate.com/blogs/the_slatest/2013/02/27/college_co...

Second, the very idea that college "upgrades" the asset is specious at best. http://www.amazon.com/Academically-Adrift-Limited-Learning-C...

Third, people with degrees do earn more, but remember that they actually take four years or more off. That's 4 years of taxes and raises that the government doesn't get. Given wages in a lot of non-degree jobs that don't require degrees (public employee unions and public safety work come to mind), this is not an insignificant amount.

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