Found 4 comments on HN
dmix · 2017-06-18 · Original thread
A good entry point are one of these books which start from the very beginning of math in Egypt/Greece and teach the fundamentals of math through a narrative as humans discovered the various parts:

"Mathematics for the Nonmathematician" https://www.amazon.com/Mathematics-Nonmathematician-Morris-K...

or

"Mathematics for the Million" https://www.amazon.com/Mathematics-Million-Master-Magic-Numb...

Of the two I prefered Kline's book but they are both good, albeit a bit heavy on geometery as that was a big focus of early math research.

Another great starting point is "Book of Proofs" and "Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning" to give you a deeper sense of how to approach the subject.

https://www.amazon.com/Book-Proof-Richard-Hammack/dp/0989472...

https://www.amazon.com/Introduction-Mathematical-Reasoning-N...

From there I went down this path (the order of which is up to you, each has tons of good source material):

-> Proofs/Logic

-> Algebra

-> Linear Algebra

-> Calculus

-> Abstract Algebra

-> Set Theory

-> Group Theory

-> Category Theory

-> Statistics/Probability

-> Discrete Mathematics

I never did well with learning math in a classroom but I've grown to love math through this process. There are lots of applications in programming as well. It makes approaching the deeper parts of Haskell/FP, data science, and machine learning much more accessible. I particularly liked the higher level Abstract Algebra stuff over the more grinding equations of calculus/linear algebra as it was more similar to programming.

spc476 · 2014-12-04 · Original thread
I found "Mathematics for the Millions" (http://www.amazon.com/Mathematics-Million-Master-Magic-Numbe...) to be a very interesting read. It goes through the history of math, how it was discovered and used, from ancient Egypt (geometry) to the 1600s (Calculus) and shows the progression of thought.
davidjhall · 2014-04-13 · Original thread
I'm surprised no one has mention Mathematics for the Millions by Lancelot Hogben. http://www.amazon.com/Mathematics-Million-Master-Magic-Numbe...

He takes the approach of starting right at the beginning of human history when we first came to look at the stars and seasons and try to understand why they work, and then builds the math knowledge with each lesson. Excellent book!

datico · 2009-02-01 · Original thread
You could try Mathematics for the Million http://www.amazon.com/Mathematics-Million-Master-Magic-Numbe... .

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