Found 2 comments on HN
pvnick · 2015-05-17 · Original thread
This is an important article. Dialectical behavior therapy and other mindfulness-based treatments are rapidly becoming go-to therapeutic methods. While I wasn't depressed or suicidal, about two months ago I started DBT training through a book [1], but used another audio book for mindfulness training [2]. The results have been fairly profound.

The key is "radical acceptance". The universe is perfect in this moment, even if there are things you don't particularly like. You are a worthy and lovable person in this moment, even as there are certain aspects of yourself that you are currently trying to change. That's the dialectical part of dialectical behavior therapy. The idea of radical acceptance is something that can be applied right now, even before learning the skills.

The author talks about shame. Shame convinces us that we are broken, that we aren't good enough. It tends to get passed through generations due to the way we are raised and the way we raise our children. Treating that shame is very effective for convincing us that we are, in fact, good enough. A book called Taming Your Outer Child [3], accompanied by meditations developed by John Bradshaw meant to get one in touch with one's inner child [4], are both very powerful for healing that shame.

Finally, I can't help but add a TED talk by Brene Brown called the Power of Vulnerability [5]. In it she describes the idea of feeling worthy and "enough," and how it is key to happiness and living a fulfilled life. For me, it was helpful because it gave me a concrete idea to work towards.

[1] http://www.amazon.com/Dialectical-Behavior-Therapy-Skills-Wo...

[2] http://www.amazon.co.uk/Mindfulness-Eight-Week-Finding-Peace...

[3] http://www.amazon.com/Taming-Your-Outer-Child-Self-Sabotage-...

[4] http://www.audible.com/pd/Self-Development/Home-Coming-Audio...

[5] https://www.ted.com/talks/brene_brown_on_vulnerability?langu...

enscr · 2013-11-13 · Original thread
It helps to learn techniques to calm the mind and at times, completely shut it off. I'd recommend a good book on meditation. This might sound like a cliche. But, it doesn't hurt to spend half an hour for a few days finishing this book and see if that changes anything for you. http://www.amazon.com/Mindfulness-practical-guide-peace-fran.... Or you could browse around for books on similar topic and find one that appeals you.

It is helping me reduce my stress levels.

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