Found 1 comment on HN
BucketSort · 2017-05-15 · Original thread
Because they are written by mathematicians. In my case, when I have learned a mathematical topic, the intuition becomes obvious and the derivations/proofs seem to be much more important for gaining a complete understanding. I have gone up against texts with complete bewilderment, only to come back after gaining the intuition and found the extensions of the core premises and proofs provided by the text to be highly enlightening.

Great math teachers understand the need to teach intuition. He wasn't a math teacher, but I think Richard Feynman is the pinnacle of this. See [1] to see how he expresses intuition about physics, and his Red Books[2] for how he teaches mathematical physics with all the qualities I believe makes a great maths text for students.

Also, there's a linear algebra MOOC which also teaches great intuition before delving into proofs and heavy detail [3]. I mention these examples because they are exemplars of this idea of teaching intuition.

[1] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4zZbX_9ru9U

[2] https://www.amazon.com/Feynman-Lectures-Physics-Vol-Mechanic...

[3]https://www.edx.org/course/linear-algebra-foundations-fronti...

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