Found 6 comments on HN
rob74 · 2019-02-25 · Original thread
Actually the influence of the Pascal family and that of the C family are about equally significant, if you go by the chart from the "Go Programming Language" book (available in the free preview, page xiii https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Language-Addison-Wesley-P...). Most significant is probably the module system, which, in good Turbo Pascal tradition, allows Go to run loops around other C-family languages (looking at you Rust ;) ), and of course the declaration syntax ("i int" instead of "int i").

Since I first came across Go I've been thinking that a Go-based Delphi clone would be really amazing. Maybe someone could breathe some new life into the Lazarus IDE by adding support for Go? Hmmm, actually there already is something: https://github.com/ying32/govcl - probably worth keeping an eye on...

karolist · 2019-02-12 · Original thread
I'll structure this in "current/future/recent_past" format if I may.

Currently:

* The Go Programming Language

https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Language-Addison-Wesley-P...

* Building Microservices

https://www.amazon.com/Building-Microservices-Designing-Fine...

Plan to do next:

* Designing Data-Intensive Applications

https://www.amazon.com/Designing-Data-Intensive-Applications...

* Designing Distributed Systems

https://www.amazon.com/Designing-Distributed-Systems-Pattern...

* Unix and Linux System Administration 5th ed, but probably just gonna skip/read chapters of interest, i.e. I wanna get a better understanding of SystemD.

https://www.amazon.com/UNIX-Linux-System-Administration-Hand...

Read last month:

* Learning React

Good for a quick intro but I probably wouldn't read cover-to-cover again, some sections are old, but overall an OK book.

https://www.amazon.com/Learning-React-Functional-Development...

* React Design Patterns and Best Practices

Really liked this one, picked a tonne of new ideas and approaches that are hard to find otherwise for a newbie in JS scene. These two books, some time spent reading up on webpack and lots of github/practice code made me not scared of JS anymore and not feeling the fatigue. I mean, I was one of the people who dismissed everything frontend related, big node_modules, electron, complicated build systems etc. But now I sort of understand why and am on the different side of the fence.

https://www.amazon.com/React-Design-Patterns-Best-Practices/...

* Flexbox in CSS

Wanted to understand what's the new flexbox layout is about since it's been a while when I've done some serious CSS work. Long story short I made it about half of this and dropped it - not any more useful than MDN docs and actually playing with someone's codepen gave me better understanding in 5 minutes than 3 hours spent with this book.

https://www.amazon.com/Flexbox-CSS-Estelle-Weyl-ebook/dp/B07...

clumsysmurf · 2017-02-16 · Original thread
I'm wondering if "The Go Programming Language 1e" (Donovan / Kernighan) is still relevant enough to be used as a first book for self teaching.

https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Language-Addison-Wesley-P...

testUser69 · 2017-02-03 · Original thread
I haven't read Accelerated C++, but these were good, at least intermediate guides, to the Go language IMO:

https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Language-Addison-Wesley-P...

https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Language-Phrasebook-Devel...

Also the official spec is a good read:

https://golang.org/ref/spec

tapan_k · 2016-08-02 · Original thread
I have the same question.

I recently read a programming book on Go [1] and this book reminded me of the pleasure of reading a programming book cover to cover. For a reader whose purpose is not to just get through the coursework (as in a graduate school), a well written programming book can be as pleasurable a read (if not more) than the most gripping novel. The author's style of writing has a lot to do with the readability of a programming book. I think.

[1]: https://www.amazon.com/Programming-Language-Addison-Wesley-P...

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