Found 5 comments on HN
Balgair · 2018-05-16 · Original thread
Ramanujan was easily one of the greatest mathematicians in history. Full Stop.

Entirely self-taught, his insights were incredibly novel and have helped human advancement immeasurably. Incredible stories about this great person abound. Sadly, he died at 32 from a curable disease, though misdiagnosed. He was deeply religious, a devout Hindu and vegetarian. His legacy is truly astonishing despite his few years. What he could have accomplished, had he lived, is a tragedy of the first order to mathematics and the human quest for truth.

Here is a good biography if you are interested: https://www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Knew-Infinity-Ramanujan/dp/14...

bogomipz · 2016-07-14 · Original thread
Its great to see Ramunujan getting a fair bit of attention these days. His story is really fascinating. I can recommend:

https://www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Knew-Infinity-Ramanujan/dp/06...

This was also made into a movie a couple of months ago, I haven't seen the movie but it should be on netflix/itunes by now since I don't think it had a wide theatrical release.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0787524/

meeper16 · 2015-06-04 · Original thread
Bottom line: You're constructing and executing math and likely do not realize how much math you are constructing and executing on a daily basis. This includes formal and experimental advanced theoretical mathematics, probability, statistics and number theory in some cases. Some academics do not like to hear this, however, you deal(industry term) in functions, variables, minimums, maximums, rates of change, statistics, probability and overall, symbols. If you're duplicating the next facebook (as facebook did with myspace and myspace, friendster, etc etc), snapchat or yo app your likely not directly engaged in much math or innovation compared to inventing something on the algorithmic level like Google. If you are creating or inventing something new on the software engineering level including the algorithmic level, then you are certainly creating a lot of theoretical math and perhaps without even knowing it. This is key.

Here's a good book to understand how you've leap-frogged certain aspects of mathematics via true and real innovative Computer Science: (the Einstein of India. Every country and family has their very own Einstein, you might be one of them.)

The Man Who Knew Infinity: A Life of the Genius Ramanujan http://www.amazon.com/The-Man-Who-Knew-Infinity/dp/067175061...

Xcelerate · 2012-12-17 · Original thread
I love articles like this. Ramanujan was a very interesting man and perhaps had some of the deepest mathematical insights of anyone who existed. People are still trying to figure out what the things he wrote down meant. If you want to know more about his life, there's a great book called "The Man who Knew Infinity" (http://www.amazon.com/The-Man-Who-Knew-Infinity/dp/067175061...)
jyothi · 2009-05-22 · Original thread
I read "The Man Who Knew Infinity" - Ramanujan's biography and it was fantastic read.

http://www.amazon.com/Man-Who-Knew-Infinity-Ramanujan/dp/068... Do check out recommendations by Amazon, seems like a great set of books.

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