Found in 2 comments on Hacker News
dwringer · 2019-05-14 · Original thread
> The kind of math musicians talk about are elementary ratios that concern the relationships between tones and between frequencies, nothing to write home about.

Perhaps in general this is often true, but Guerino Mazzola might have a thing or two to say about that, having published work applying topos theory to music.[1][2] Admittedly it appears to meet with some controversy and I haven't studied his work myself. My apologies for not having any more accessible links on hand to the subject material.

[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guerino_Mazzola

[2] https://www.amazon.com/Topos-Music-Geometric-Concepts-Perfor...

For a more professional and thoughtful look at music and combinatorial math I suggest:

http://dmitri.mycpanel.princeton.edu/geometry-of-music.html

There's also

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Topos-Music-Geometric-Concepts-Perf...

Although IMO it's mostly blather - unlike Tymoczko, who's worth reading.

There are no complete scientific theories of music and there never will be, because music is a huge and semi-random collection of cultural experiments and stylistic conventions built only very loosely on perceptual psychology.

Academic theory books define an alphabet of terms, but the rest is learned by practice and experiment, oral teaching, and by listening, copying, and varying.

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