Found in 3 comments
repolfx · 2018-06-10 · Original thread
It's not actually. This book argues for the position that expert advice is wrong more often than not:

https://www.amazon.com/Wrong-us---Scientists-relationship-co...

The dubious reliability of much advice presented in the media as expert advice is one of the impending themes of our time. Expect skepticism about "experts" (defined as the sort of people who we tend to be told are experts when debating matters of politics, wealth or health) only to increase in the coming years.

The Swiss National Bank themselves, who will be put in charge of all lending if this is implemented, say this is a bad idea

The Overton window of acceptable thought in central banking is laughably narrow. Central bankers should really be the last people who are listened to on changes to how the monetary system works - they will always argue for minor changes to the status quo.

aedocw · 2013-10-20 · Original thread
David H. Feedman wrote an excellent book* on this very topic. "Wrong: Why experts keep failing us--and how to know when not to trust them"

He goes very deep into the research around confirmation bias and cultural beliefs that cause doctors to be very confident and believe they are absolutely right when they are at best 50/50. Obviously not all experts/doctors are rightly only 50% of the time, but I found the book to be extremely informative. ALWAYS question experts - the worst thing you can do is shut your brain down.

[1]http://www.amazon.com/Wrong-us---relationship-consultants-eb...

Aside from the particulars of this case, I just got through reading a book recommended by another HN'er: "Wrong: Why experts keep failing us--and how to know when not to trust them" http://amzn.to/aNY2rL

And while I have always been a skeptic of just about anything, even I was struck by the perverse disincentives there are for reporting scientific malpractice. If you're a student, then you're side-tracked and black-listed. If your'e a colleague, you're shunned. Even professional publications get in on the act -- positive findings outrank negative findings when it comes to publication by a factor of 10-1.

Good book. A little over-the-top, but powerful and relevant.

View this Book on Amazon